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Old 09-06-2013, 05:42 AM
skeeter@ccia.com skeeter@ccia.com is offline
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semi shotgun hangs up

I can't go into what make/model etc on this 12g shotgun a friend has but with about every 3 rounds it will hang on him. This is what I found in the field. Holding upside down, the feeder ramp is on a spring however it takes finger pressure to move it up then about 1/2 way, the spring takes over and will work on it's own. This as I looked while a round was jammed was the reason the front of shell was never aimed into the chamber jamming it. This guy went to the Pittsburgh gunsmith school for a while but need of a job made him quit but he insists that feeder ramp should work that way. I showed him where it was scratching on the one side and that is where it was holding it from the spring letting it flip the round up to chamber. He says it needs to be tight on that side to work the bolt. I said then why did they put a spring in there to let the ramp flip the round up nose first? I think if he would work a little more clearance on that side as already on the other side of the ramp, the spring will work as intended. When a round enters, spring of the ramp will flip nose first toward chamber then the bolt will push on in. Who is correct? Should you need finger pressure to move the ramp or should it work free with spring tension? It does lock where needed until you fire the shotgun work the bolt, ramp hangs up...I say need free float with spring tension.. Gunsmiths out there,....correct me if I am wrong. thanks in advance.
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Old 09-06-2013, 09:31 PM
skeet skeet is offline
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Most shell lifters need to be free to rise and fall without touching. But the feed ramp is kinda operated on..say an 1100 platform by the bolt in a round about way..on a Win 50 directly and on Berettas etc in a bit different manner..if my recollection is correct. Only auto I have worked on in the last few years is 1100s..other than cleaning the Berettas I have. Luckily I have no Brownings...lol!
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Old 09-07-2013, 05:43 PM
wrenchman wrenchman is offline
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Try looking up a blue print with out knowing the model it would be real hard to tell you need a good break down.
Stoeger has imported a few guns from turkey over the years inter arms has to from china
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Old 09-07-2013, 06:34 PM
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GoodOlBoy GoodOlBoy is offline
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Yeah because on a model 11 remmy it is more like a browning auto 5 (humpback) in that the bolt does more of the operation (like on a 1100) from what I remember. However! I have a solution(s) for you. Since it only does this "about every 3 rounds" it tells me a little more. (Still hard to diagnose without knowing the model)

Solution #1 IF it happens almost always on the third round. (IE #1 and #2 work 90%+) You may have a weak magazine spring that needs to be replaced. The follower isn't shoving the third round far enough back to get it in the proper position for the feed ramp to lift it. There is enough pressure against the first few rounds, but not beyond that because of the weak spring. Replace the magazine spring.

Solution #2 IF if is completely random what round number it jams on you may have a gun that is fouled with buildup on the inside. Tension be danged, if you have enough burnt powder, sand, etc up in the mechanisms around the bolt you are going to have odd behaviors, feeds, etc. That being said it may LOOK clean, and even WIPE clean, but the grime can get behind all those little moving buggers and be a real pain in the keister. Unload and dismantle the shotgun, give it a good cleaning with break free, then a light coat of oil on each part as you reassemble. Work the bolt a few times to see if it feels "better" then go test fire it.

Solution #3 The flinch. I have seen it happen (as it does with some autopistols) that a person flinching on a semi shotgun will cause it to jam now and then. (its RARE to see it on a long gun) Be certain it is fired from the shoulder (not "cowboying" from the hip) and that there is good solid shoulder meld and contact.

Additional question.
Does it do it with all types of ammo you use in the gun? IE light field, express, long range, heavy field, etc.

Richard
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Old 09-08-2013, 06:32 AM
buckhunter buckhunter is offline
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GOB Try solution #2. I have a browning A5 and action never gets cleaned unless I get my air compressor out. Also if I remember right there is a adjustment for hi base and low base loads. Not sure if that might help.
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Old 09-08-2013, 09:01 AM
Jack Jack is offline
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I am not an expert shotgun mechanic, but, I have learned that, no matter what is wrong with an autoloader, the first thing you do is clean it. Not run a swab down the barrel - detail strip it and clean every part.
When the gun is totally clean, lightly oil and reassemble. My experience has been, barring an obviously broken part (which you will find during a total stripdown cleaning), 90% of the time, whatever was wrong has disappeared, and the gun works fine.
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