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Old 06-05-2016, 03:13 PM
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Remington Rolling Block 7x57

I recently acquired a 1901 Remington Rolling Block 7 mm. This is supposed to be the 7x57, BUT maybe not exactly. This model was built for several nations armies, and this rifle has a bayonet lug. I have read that this model MAY have excessive headspace and require modified brass for loading safely and shooting. Other sources say they fire standard sized 7x57 ammo. I took the gun to a local gunsmith who superficially looked it over, said it looked very good and safe to fire, but did not specifically measure headspace even though that was my specific question. I do know that this gun should be loaded with cast bullets and at much lower pressure (velocity) than modern 7x57 weapons. I have read about methods of neck sizing with a .30 caliber die, then partially neck sizing only with the 7x57 die to create a false shoulder, loading the ammo and firing to produce fire-formed brass to then be loaded for this gun. This process is described as being hard on case necks, requiring frequent annealing of the necks. One source also indicated that this neck sizing requires a neck sizing die while others imply that it can be done with a regular die so long as you do not size the entire case. This whole process seems like more than I may want to tackle, but I hate to give up without trying. I already have 7x57 reloading dies and brass as I have loaded (much hotter) ammo for a Ruger #1 in this caliber for years. I may not ever shoot this gun a lot, but would really like to shoot enough to determine point of aim and to kill a deer with it. The rear sight is a ramp for elevation which also can be raised for greater distances. There are numbers on the left side of the ramp from 1 through 5, and on the elevated portion from 6 through 19. I wondered if this represented ranges from 100 to 1900 yards? Any reliable help with info about safely shooting this gun would be appreciated.
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Old 06-06-2016, 07:31 AM
Jack Jack is offline
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Sounds like you have a nice old rifle to play with!
Your described method of necking up 7x57 cases to 30 caliber and then necking them down to 7mm to create a false shoulder will work - use standard 7x57 dies to neck back down - back the 7x57 sizer out of your press until it just barely begins to size the neck down, then try the case in the rifle. You will have to adjust the die down and try the case in the rifle several times before you get the cases to just barely fit in the chamber.
Then load a moderate load in the cases and fire form. After that, you have cases that fit your chamber.
One tip: start with new brass. New brass is more elastic than brass that's been fired before - you will get much better fire forming with new brass.
The old rolling block action isn't as strong as modern actions, so keep the loads moderate. The original military 7x57 load was a 170 round nose at about 2200 fps. That load is likely what the sights were regulated for.
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Old 06-06-2016, 01:04 PM
Adam Helmer Adam Helmer is offline
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DocHunter,

I got my M1901 7mm Remington Rolling Block in 1961 for $11.67 from Ye Olde Hunter. Jack gave you the specifics on reloading for the old rolling block. Back off your 7mm resizing die about a half, or quarter turn, resize and try in the rolling block. Resize enough until the block rolls up and the hammer will fall upon trigger pull.

I load the Lyman #287308 175 grain roundnose cast bullet in my M1901. I need to elevate to about "500" for point of aim/point of impact at 100 yards.

At the last gun show nearby, a Poor Grade M1901 was tagged at $1,100.00. I have an original "Short Tooth" bayonet for mine, so I would ask for more money, if I ever sell.

Adam
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Old 06-07-2016, 04:18 PM
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Thanks for the info. Mine has a bayonet lug. Any idea where one might find a bayonet that works? Just curious - Since 7 X 57 was already around in 1901, why the chamber difference?
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Old 03-14-2017, 05:04 PM
RugerNo3 RugerNo3 is offline
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This is an old thread, but the answer is the generic 7x57 was chambered to military standards in Europe as well as Central and South America. Tolerances varied. Better to be safe then sorry.
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